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learned the nsa does not have the technological capabilities to adequately protect against american communications and a miss to communications from being collected. once this data is collected, it goes to a massive database and analysts can search these databases and touch american communications that goes against a court order. they basically said, what you're doing is unconstitutional. you have to put in new parameters to limit the search to protect americans. we don't know if it worked. we had it last week by the washington post that said thousands of abuses are still existing at the nsa. >> a shocking revelation as well. that core is supposed to provide adequate oversight and critics have called it it a rubberstamp court. does this back up either one of those claims? >> you mentioned the former judge that a sickly said, this is the third revelation where the nsa has misrepresented what it is doing with their authority here. judge bates notes that we can't know for certain how many people have been touched by this. that is the 56,000 number we have been talking about. this goes
dugan, technologist at the open technology institute in d.c. and i started by asking bryan about the government's claim that it is not fully aware of the extent of edward snowden's leaks. >> it is incredibly disturbing that they do not know what was taken, no audit trail was created. that is the type of abrogation of trust that the united states government needs to restore and that is why the president of the united states needs to instate an independent, external council of experts to review the nsa spying. on all these systems that edward snowden was using, they, by default, should be creating audit trails of every single action of every single administrator on the machine. edward snowden was not the top- level administrator of this machine. he happened to have access across domains at a top-secret security level. there is no excuse for any administrator to not keep logs of that type of information, and it is entirely disturbing and untrustworthy of the nsa to not keep track of that type of intermission -- information. >> or they are being less than truthful as we have seen or
for our weekly tech report, the latest news on technology on all things digital. today we are talking about facebook. the social media behemoth saw its value climb over $100 billion for the first time ever, one year following its record low. the company closed at $43.34 earlier this week, bringing its value by market capitalization to $106 billion. fortunately for facebook, this week also saw the end of an extended court case in which facebook will pay $20 million in settlements to users who objected to their information being used as part of advertiser promotions. a pew research report shows teens are wary about the same privacy issues. here to discuss all things facebook is our guest. >> thanks. >> we will start out -- teenagers are becoming more concerned with privacy, but the rate at which teenagers are -- and adults are sharing information is so incredibly high. 51% of teen users have avoided certain apps due to privacy concerns. when he six percent have installed an app due to personal info collection. 26% have turned off location tracking features. do you think we are turning a
to new technology. that means huge amounts of money will flow into very poor countries. in fact, all 12 of these african nations are projected to the major oil fires -- players, currently in the bottom half of the u.n.'s human development index. these new exports could inject $3 trillion into their economies. they had a combined gdp in 2011 of just $181 billion. what effect might then have? history tells us it could mean bad news for the people of those countries. that is because when countries suddenly discover a viable resource and receive an influx of cash, they succumb to what is known as the resource curse, wealth inequality surging, corruption running rampant, and democratic institutions and quality of life breaking down. perhaps it is worth noting that of all the developing nations that are now receiving a majority of their earnings from oil and gas, not a single one has a functioning democracy. why does this happen? to answer that question, i was joined earlier by an adjunct professor at georgetown university and the founder of the democracy and conflict research institute. i st
this short break, it is a technology update. this is rt. >> sometimes, it seems like things are helpless. doing against the system, you never know. in fact, if you remember a discussion about pink slime being used across america with frozen fast foods, chef jamie oliver has managed to shane mcdonald enough on television to get them to back down and stop using this ultra-processed product at their establishments, and we discussed a racist portrayal of russians in a game. there were thousands of signatures on a petition, and the game has been pulled from russian shells by the developer. they do all a lot of bad things because they have no morals and are obsessed with profit, but because they have no morals they will instantly start cowering at your feet. sometimes. that is just my opinion. captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org-- >>> welcome to "newsline." it's monday august 26th. i'm catherine toeb yashy in tokyo. >>> united nations inspectors will visit alleged sites for chemical weapons attacks. they say hundreds of people were killed.
is worth making note of when it comes to privacy. >> the piece of technology we consider vital to the conduct of our everyday professional life, it happens to be a combination phone bugged, listening device, location tracker, and hidden camera. >> we know the government is collecting sensitive information from e-mail to your mom to the text in calls of a significant other. it is not that easy to escape the eyes and ears of the federal government. on the local level, some people are looking to change that. >> i am a state representative out of montana. >> he made it is mission to keep government intrusion at bay, or at least, that is his ultimate goal. he has a number of legislation bills for privacy. he wants proof of probable cause before obtaining location data. even though he is a newcomer, he is already making a difference. it transmits a signal to a local tower that concord and eight your precise location within inches. law enforcement doesn't need a warrant to get this information. montana was the first state to acquire probable cause. >> getting cell phone locations, we
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